Vegetarian compared to raw

Is there a difference between vegetarian and raw food diets? A raw foodist is a vegetarian, but one who generally is not going to cook his vegetables or fruits. A vegetarian is someone who simply doesn’t eat meat, fish or poultry, but only consumes vegetables, pasta, and rice. A vegetarian might eat meatless spaghetti sauce or order onion rings in a restaurant. (Not the healthiest choice, but sometimes it’s hard to find something to eat in a restaurant if you’re vegetarian – even harder if you’re a raw foodist.)
There are different categories of vegetarians, like vegans, or fruitarians, and raw foodist is a category of vegetarianism. We haven’t seen anything about sushi being considered a raw food, but it is. Raw food, though, generally means eating raw, uncooked fruits, vegetables, dried fruits, seaweeds, etc.

But to be a raw food purist means raw broccoli, not steamed. To a vegetarian, someone committed to not eat meat or fish or animal products, steamed vegetables are just as good, although everyone would agree that steaming can take out nutrients from foods, rendering them less nutritious. A vegetarian might consume dairy or egg products; however a vegan will not consume any animal products at all. And a raw foodist is a vegan who consumes only uncooked, unprocessed raw foods.
Proponents of the raw diet believe that enzymes are the life force of a food and that every food contains its own perfect mix. These enzymes help us digest foods completely, without relying on our body to produce its own cocktail of digestive enzymes.
It is also thought that the cooking process destroys vitamins and minerals and that cooked foods not only take longer to digest, but they also allow partially digested fats, proteins and carbohydrates to clog up our gut and arteries.

Followers of a raw diet cite numerous health benefits, including:
• increased energy levels
• improved appearance of skin
• improved digestion
• weight loss
• reduced risk of heart disease

Tricks to Eat Healthier at Restaurants

EAT at restaurants anymore because there is not a particular celebration or special occasion. Currently, eating out has become a daily habit for many people. Without realizing it, the food they eat is not healthy for the body.

The average restaurant serving food in large portions, high fat and calories, also contains less fiber and nutrients than food served at home. If you often eat out, it is important to make healthy choices as you do at home.

Here’s the trick:

Choose restaurants that offer healthy food
Before making the order or sitting at a table, be sure to ask the restaurant if they will do the following things:
– Accommodates demand for cooking instructions and the use of food ingredients, such as those made from whole wheat bread, whole wheat pasta or brown rice.
– Use lean cuts of meat. If the results are still cooking in fat or skin, do not eat alias remove.
– Serve butter, gravvy sauce, sauces, and dressings separately so that you can measure as needed.
– Use margarine to replace butter and low-fat milk to replace the cream.

A little cooking oil
Choose foods steamed, baked, or boiled. Avoid cooking method that uses oils and fats, such as frying.

Always ask for water
Ask for a glass of water or drinks that contain lemon juice, instead of high-calorie drink, soft drinks, or alcoholic beverages to accompany your meal.

Eating a salad before eating the main course
Eat salads in large quantities consisting of raw vegetables prior to or simultaneously with your food. Be sure to order the sauce separately so you only take as much as needed. Try dip the fork into the sauce to get the flavor of the sauce just a bit, which is at the end before eating lettuce.

Note servings
Most restaurants serve food with portions big enough to feed two people for. If excessive, eat half, and the rest can ask wrapped to take home so they can be eaten at any other time.

Should not need to order dessert, just an appetizer in the form of soup or salad. Or, just messaging as a piece of fruit or gelatin dessert.